Colchicine medscape

Gout and Pseudogout - Medscape Reference

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Hyperuricemia Treatment & Management - Medscape Reference

Treatment of acute gout flares (Colcrys): 1.2 mg PO at first sn of flare, then 0.6 mg 1 hr later; not to exceed 1.8 mg in 1-hr period Prophylaxis (Colcrys, Mitare): 0.6 mg PO once daily or q12hr; not to exceed 1.2 mg/day; after gout flare, wait 12 hr to continue prophylaxis Colcrys: 1.2-2.4 mg/day PO in single daily dose or divided q12hr; increased in 0.3 mg/day increments as necessary to control disease; decreased in 0.3 mg/day increments if intolerable side effects develop; not to exceed 2.4 mg/day Disseminated intravascular coagulation Cellular injury (eg, to kidney, vasculature, liver, central nervous system) Myelosuppression Neurologic: Sensory motor neuropathy Dermatologic: Alopecia, purpura, maculopapular rash, rash GI: Lactose intolerance, abdominal cramping, abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, nausea Hematologic: Thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, granulocytopenia, pancytopenia, aplastic anemia Hepatobiliary: Elevated liver transaminases Musculoskeletal: Myotonia, muscle weakness, myopathy, elevated creatine phosphokinase, muscle pain, rhabdomyolysis Reproductive: Azoospermia, olospermia Coadministration with P-gp or strong CY3A4 inhibitors in patients with hepatic or renal impairment; life-threatening and fatal colchicine toxicity has been reported with therapeutic dosages Hypersensitivity Long term use is established for FMF, but safety and efficacy of repeat treatment in gout flares has not been evaluated Not to be used to treat pain from other causes; drug is not analgesic Must be kept out of reach of children; fatal overdoses have been reported Blood dyscrasias (eg, leukopenia, myelosuppression, thrombocytopenia, pancytopenia, granulocytopenia, aplastic anemia) have been reported at therapeutic dosages Coadministration with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors may warrant dosage reduction or interruption of therapy Rhabdomyolysis and neuromuscular toxicity have been reported with long-term treatment at therapeutic dosages; increased risk with renal dysfunction, elderly patients, concomitant therapy with myotoxic drugs; symptoms generally resolve within 1 week to few months upon discontinuance Acute gout: Dosages 1.8 mg/day provide no additional efficacy Dose reduction recommended in patients who develop gastrointestinal symptoms including anorexia, diarrhea, vomiting, or nausea due to the therapy Clearance is decreased in renal and hepatic impairment; monitor for toxicity and adjust dose if necessary Use with caution in the elderly; consider adjusting dose Gout: Disruption of cytoskeletal functions through inhibition of β-tubulin polymerization into microtubules; this prevents activation, degranulation, and mration of neutrophils thought to mediate some gout symptoms FMF: Mechanism not established; may interfere with intracellular assembly of inflammasome complex present in neutrophils and monocytes, which mediates activation of interleukin-1β The above information is provided for general informational and educational purposes only.

Hyperuricemia Treatment & Management - <b>Medscape</b> Reference

Where Is Generic Colchicine? - Medscape

-The safety and effectiveness of repeat treatment in gout flares has not been evaluated.

Dangerous and Deadly Drug Combinations -

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